Monday, April 6, 2015

Autoimmune System and Cesarian Section Birth in Dogs

An number of dog breeds with excessively large heads must deliver pups via Cesarean birth. Breed clubs admit that 80% of births in the Boston Terrier, Bulldog and French Bulldog are by C-section. 

Because of the size  and shape
of the skull, most Boston Terriers
 are delivered by C-section.

Boston Terrier puppy compared to a Jack Russell Terrier
 In vaginal birth, the fetus departs the womb completely sterile without a single microbe. Passing through the mother’s birth canal covers the baby with colonies of bacteria that kick-start the immune system.  Cesarean deliveries may contribute to an increase in autoimmune weaknesses because newborns lack the appropriate microbes.
Bulldog and Labrador Retriever pups.
Note differences in skull size.
An infant's diverse microbial community is essential to establish a healthy digestive tract, help shape the growing brain, and even protect from psychiatric disorders.  (http://gut.bmj.com/content/63/4/559.short)
 
French Bulldog and Dalmatian
Even big dogs have skulls
relative to the size of their bodies. 


Do C-section pups start life lacking the microbes they would normally have picked up from vaginal delivery delaying the colonization of healthy microbes?
 
In 2009 the United Kingdom Kennel Club
 banned the breeding of traits
 that are cruel and disabling for dogs.
This includes the hallmark
deformed skull of the Bulldog.  

Because most of the health issues in these breed are due to their physical structure, the study of medical disorders connected to the slow introduction of protective bacteria is not well studied. 


2 comments:

  1. Very interesting post - skull size and delivery issues in dogs is something I'd never given thought to.....thanks for sharing this....

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  2. I recently saw a program where they discussed this as a cause (in humans) for the increases we have seen in asthma, type 1 diabetes and allergies over the last number of decades. We fool with Mother Nature at our own risk.

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